Outdoor Screening Series: Canadian Indigenous Shorts

Hamilton Artists Inc. is pleased to continue it’s inagural outdoor screening series in 2016. This presentation of Canadian Indigenous Shorts is presented in partnership with imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival.
 
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Danis Goulet, Wapawekka (film still), 2010. (16 mins)

Canadian Indigenous Shorts

Presented in partnership by imagineNATIVE & Hamilton Artists Inc.
When: September 30, 8:00 pm (Doors at 7:30 pm)
Rain date: October 1, 8:00 pm
Where: Hamilton Artists Inc.’s Arcelor Mittal Dofasco Courtyard – 155 James St. N. Hamilton
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* Some seating will be provided. Feel free to BYO lawn-chair or blanket
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Hamilton Artists Inc. is pleased to partner with imagineNATIVE on this program of Canadian Indigenous Shorts leading up to the presentation of the 17th annual imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival, October 19 – 23, 2016 in Toronto.
 
imagineNATIVE is the world’s largest presenter of Indigenous screen content. imagineNATIVE’s Festival, Tour, and year-round initiatives showcase, promote, and celebrate Canadian and international Indigenous filmmakers and media artists and create a greater understanding of Indigenous peoples, cultures, and artistic expressions. Prior to screening the program, representatives from imagineNATIVE will provide some background on their organization and this year’s festival.
 
Canadian Indigenous Shorts Program:
 
Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Inuit High Kick, 2010. (2:48)
Lisa Jackson, The Visit, 2009. (3:00)
Danis Goulet, Wapawekka, 2010. (16:00)
Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Lumaajuuq, 2010. (7:00)
Alejandro Valbuena, Burnt, 2010. (13:35)
Kate Kroll, Shi-shi-etko, 2009. (5:55)
Lisa Jackson, Savage, 2009. (6:00)
Jeff Barnaby, File Under Miscellaneous, 2010. (7:00)
 
Hamilton Artists Inc. would like to thank imagineNATIVE for sharing this collection of Indigenous short film with audiences in Hamilton and the surrounding area. For more information on the imagineNATIVE Film and Media Arts Festival, October 19 – 23, please visit: http://www.imaginenative.org/
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About the Films:
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Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Inuit High Kick, 2010. (2:48)
Inuit High Kick is a dramatic representation of an athlete performing the traditional high kick in super-slow motion. The high kick is an ancient celebration of Inuit culture and the film is a stunning demonstration of timeless athleticism.
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Lisa Jackson, The Visit, 2009. (3:00)
The Visit tells the true story of a Cree family’s strange encounter one winter night, which results in a conversation beyond words.
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Danis Goulet, Wapawekka, 2010. (16:00)
A final visit to their isolated cabin in northern Canada reveals the inter-generational rift between Josh and his traditional Cree father.
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Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, Lumaajuuq, 2010. (7:00)
This animated short is a tragic and twisted story about the dangers of revenge. A cruel mother mistreats her son, feeding him dog meat and forcing him to sleep in the cold. A loon, who tells the boy that his mother blinded him, helps the child regain his eyesight. Then the boy seeks revenge, releasing his mother’s lifeline as she harpoons a whale and watching her drown. Based on a portion of the epic Inuit legend “The Blind Boy and the Loon.”
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Alejandro Valbuena, Burnt, 2010. (13:35)
A monochromatic account of childhood memories through the lover’s voice; based on a real life story.
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Kate Kroll, Shi-shi-etko, 2009. (5:55)
Four days before having to leave her family and home for residential school, Shi-shi-etko learns how important it is to hold on to her memories.
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Lisa Jackson, Savage, 2009. (6:00)
On a summer day in the 1950s, a native girl watches the countryside go by from the backseat of a car. A woman at her kitchen table sings a lullaby in her Cree language. When the girl arrives at her destination, she undergoes a transformation that will turn the woman’s gentle voice into a howl of anger and pain.
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Jeff Barnaby, File Under Miscellaneous, 2010. (7:00)
Pablo Neruda’s poem “Walking Around” inspires a gorgeous and gruesome fantasy of a destitute Mi’kmaq man who decides to assimilate into the ruling culture.

 
Hamilton Artists Inc. would like to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is the traditional territory of the Haudensaunee and Anishnaabeg. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties and directly adjacent to Haldiman Treaty territory.

 


The Inc.’s Outdoor Screening Series is made possible through project support by Incite Foundation for the Arts, Hamilton Community Foundation and Mohawk College.

 

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